Articles
Dozen of companies, from Apple to Zappos, have reacted to George Floyd’s killing and the protests that followed by pledging to make their workforces more diverse. While commendable, to me it feels a bit like deja vu. Back in 2014, a host of tech companies made similar commitments to diversify their ranks. Their latest reports – which they release annually – show they’ve made little progress. Why have their efforts largely failed? Were they just empty promises? As a gender diversity scholar, I explored these questions in my recent paper published in the Stanford Technology Law Review. The problem is not a lack of commitment but what social scientists call “unconscious bias.”
15.08.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
Before the lockdown, people who voluntarily worked remotely were often marginalised compared with their colleagues working in the office. Studies show that remote workers could often feel professionally and socially isolated. The physical distance between remote workers and their on-site colleagues meant they missed out on learning opportunities. Those working remotely would also frequently miss ad hoc conversations and collaborations in the workplace, formal and informal team meetings, and in-person social events, such as after-work drinks. Remote workers would often feel excluded from the team. But when the pandemic struck many people usually based in the office were forced to work from home too. Businesses had to use technol…
13.08.2020 · From The_Conversation_UK
The shortage of crucial medical supplies, especially personal protective equipment, has crippled the United States’ ability to quell the COVID-19 pandemic. At least 54,000 nursing home residents and workers have died from COVID-19 in the U.S. as of June 26. This is a staggering number when compared to nursing homes in Hong Kong, which have reported zero deaths despite cramped quarters. Other countries with ample PPE, such as South Korea and New Zealand, have reported few deaths in nursing homes. The shortage of PPE in the United States has gone on for months and is expected to exacerbate in a second wave of COVID-19 pandemic, due to ...
14.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
Corporate animal agriculture is in crisis, and its days are numbered. Factory farming and industrialized animal slaughtering are being recognized as dangerous for workers’ health, as potential causes of the next pandemic and as both ethically and environmentally unsustainable. Early numbers suggest noteworthy increases in the purchase of plant-based foods during the pandemic. New vegan products are being brought to market almost weekly. And advancements in cultured “clean” meat may soon result in mass production. These technological innovations mean that meat can be created for those who wish to consume it without needing to kill animals. Diverse investors, including Bill Gates, Richard Branson, Leonardo DiCaprio …
13.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_Canada