Browse Articles By Tag: usa
When it comes to conducting classes this fall, most colleges seem to be stuck between holding in-person or remote classes, or some combination of the two. As a researcher who focuses on the design of educational spaces, I believe there’s a fourth option that’s not being given its due: outdoor spaces, such as open-air tents. From a learning space design perspective, this could be an effective way of maintaining in-person instruction, even when ...
22.08.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
I’m a professor who has spent the last 10 years preparing new teachers to enter the workforce. I also study how race, culture and power influence education and childhood development at a time when more than half of the roughly 50 million children who attend U.S. public schools are nonwhite, unlike most of their teachers. About four in five public school teachers are white, according to the latest official data. This underrepresentation is especially acute for Black male teachers. While one in four teachers are men, merely 2% are Black men. Research indicates that students of color benefit from being taught by ...
21.08.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
Dozen of companies, from Apple to Zappos, have reacted to George Floyd’s killing and the protests that followed by pledging to make their workforces more diverse. While commendable, to me it feels a bit like deja vu. Back in 2014, a host of tech companies made similar commitments to diversify their ranks. Their latest reports – which they release annually – show they’ve made little progress. Why have their efforts largely failed? Were they just empty promises? As a gender diversity scholar, I explored these questions in my recent paper published in the Stanford Technology Law Review. The problem is not a lack of commitment but what social scientists call “unconscious bias.”
15.08.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
“The nurse at the clinic said, ‘he did not mean it.’ He drugged my drink. How could he not ‘mean it?’ My grades plummeted. I quit college. I lost my dignity. I lost me.” That statement is just one among the thousands of tweets with the hashtag #WhyIDidntReport. The hashtag went viral in 2018 after President Trump questioned why Christine Blasey Ford didn’t report the sexual assault she alleged against then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. I analyzed these tweets for a research project about obstacles that sexual assault survivors face when reporting what happened. Those obstacles include skeptical outsiders, an intimidating legal system and the trauma of having to talk about the abuse again with investigators. New…
15.08.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
With parents spending more time with their children than usual due to the COVID-19 pandemic, their need for discipline that works is greater than ever. Fortunately, there are some proven techniques. As a developmental psychologist, I believe that anyone raising little kids could learn how to better use timeouts. This disciplinary technique is among the best ways to stop frustrating child behavior, like not listening, breaking family rules or being overly aggressive. Following all the required steps is essential. Incorrect and incomplete information Psychologists have encouraged parents, o…
01.08.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
Star trails in the desert. TARIQ_M_1 / Getty ImagesOn July 14, a new Mars-bound spacecraft will launch from Japan. While several Mars missions are planned to launch over the next month, what makes this different is who’s launching it: the United Arab Emirates. Though new to space exploration, the UAE has set high goals for the probe, named Hope. The mission aims to further study the climate of Mars, but Omran Sharaf, mission lead, also says, “It’s a means for a bigger goal: to expedite the development in our educational sector, academic sector.” With space exploration usually pursued by actors like the United States, Russia, China, the European Space Agency and more recently, India, Hope will be the first mission to ...
14.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
The shortage of crucial medical supplies, especially personal protective equipment, has crippled the United States’ ability to quell the COVID-19 pandemic. At least 54,000 nursing home residents and workers have died from COVID-19 in the U.S. as of June 26. This is a staggering number when compared to nursing homes in Hong Kong, which have reported zero deaths despite cramped quarters. Other countries with ample PPE, such as South Korea and New Zealand, have reported few deaths in nursing homes. The shortage of PPE in the United States has gone on for months and is expected to exacerbate in a second wave of COVID-19 pandemic, due to ...
14.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
Editor’s note: In 2019, Amy Bonomi, a women’s studies scholar, co-edited “Women Leading Change: Breaking the Glass Ceiling, Cliff, and Slipper.” The book examines the perspectives of 23 female leaders on issues of leadership and the challenges of confronting structural racism, bias and discrimination at colleges and universities. Here are five takeaways that Bonomi offers from her book about how higher education can be hostile toward the women of color who serve as college and university leaders. 1. Not reflected in ...
14.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
Live performances ceased across the U.S. and around the world in early 2020 as governments everywhere barred large gatherings to slow the spread of the coronavirus. New York City’s Times Square resembled a ghost town by mid-March. The Metropolitan Opera of Los Angeles went dark. Nashville converted its Music City Center into a regional hospital for COVID-19 patients. But the music didn’t stop. Everyone from The Roots, the hip-hop ensemble that serves as talk show host Jimmy Fallon’s house band, to the eclectic jazz YouTuber Carlos Eiene filled the void through their ...
14.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
In the past month, there’s been an outpouring of support for Black Lives Matter from America’s largest corporations. You might have noticed Amazon, for example, announcing its support for Black Lives Matter on its homepage. Even children’s candy brands Gushers and Fruit by the Foot teamed up to condemn police brutality and “stand with those fighting for justice.” Corporate activism for racial equality and criminal justice reform is almost inescapable. Often, the assumption is that corporations are making these statements as a form of marketing. They are branding themselves as inclusive to boost their sales and maybe also attract young liberal employees. Critics ca…
10.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
Cities around the world are emerging from pandemic shutdowns and gradually allowing activities to resume. National leaders are keen to promote economic recovery, with appropriate public health precautions. Recently, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang announced economic growth plans that included creating 9 million new jobs and reducing urban unemployment to less than 5.5%. One surprise was his emphasis on street vending. After decades of trying to clear city streets of vendors, the Chinese state is now embracing them as a new source of employment and economic growth. I study urban policy and have researched the “informal economy” – activities that are not protected, regulated or often socially valued, including …
10.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
Many factors determine happiness, but one has stirred considerable controversy over the years: money. While the old adage says that money can’t buy happiness, several studies have determined that the more your income increases, the happier you are, up until US$75,000 a year. After hitting that threshold, more income doesn’t make a difference. But in a new analysis of more than 40,000 U.S. adults aged 30 and over, my colleague and I found an even deeper relationship between money and happiness. Because the survey data spanned five decades, from 1972 to 2016, we were also able to see if the link between money and happiness changed over the years. That’s where things got interesting: Today, money and happiness are more strongly…
10.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
What conditions lead to world-changing innovation? It’s an important question for business and government leaders. Contrary to the traditional notion of the solitary scientist, new products, services and technologies are rarely conceived by a single person. Instead, they’re developed and refined through feedback from colleagues, end users and collaborators. So it’s not surprising that characteristics of the social context can influence innovation. But how can you create the social context that facilitates innovation? My collaborator and I zeroed in on the idea of looking at social liberalization policies – laws like those tha…
10.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
For some combat veterans, the Fourth of July is not a time to celebrate the independence of the country they love. Instead, the holiday is a terrifying ordeal. That’s because the noise of fireworks – loud, sudden, and reminiscent of war – rocks their nervous system. Daily fireworks in many U.S. cities in recent weeks have no doubt been interfering with the sleep and peace of mind of thousands of veterans. This reaction is not unique to ...
02.07.2020 · From The_Conversation_USA
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