Browse Articles By Tag: culture
The sharp fall in population caused by the waves of plague which followed the arrival of the Black Death in 1348 led to one of the most dramatic periods of economic and social change in English history. By 1377, the population was around only a half of its pre-plague level but for those who survived there were new opportunities. With a great deal of land now available, peasants could obtain larger holdings and rent them on more favourable terms. Likewise, those who worked for wages could take advantage of the labour shortage to obtain higher wages enjoy more varied diets – with more meat and dairy – and buy a wider range of manufactured goods. The second hal…
Yesterday · From The_Conversation_UK
Some years ago, I travelled to Israel for a conference on dramaturgy. Losing my way at the train station, I was rescued by a soldier who chatted with me all the way to Tel Aviv. I dreaded what was coming. What was I doing there, he asked? In a region of endless conflict and, for this young man, daily risk, my reply seemed feeble to my ears. Yet his face lit up as if I had opened a window. Dramaturgy! A subject as far away from war and ancient hatreds as it was possible to get. He would love to talk about it. And so we did. We are not defined by the calamities that befall us. We are more than the sum of our hazards, hardships and heartbreaks. We are defined, as individuals and as a nation, by the positive content of our …
28.03.2020 · From The_Conversation_Australia
The announcement was buried by the deluge of coronavirus-related news, but on March 21st The Hague elected a “Night Mayor.” The Dutch city’s new Nachtburgemeester, Pat Smith, brought to his successful campaign a long record as an organizer of dance parties and a nightlife advocate. He joined the ranks of some 35 other night mayors, night czars, night economy ambassadors and holders of equivalent titles around the world. All of these had been appointed or elected since 2012, when Mirik Milan emerged from Amsterdam’s nighttime cultural sector to become that city’s firs…
27.03.2020 · From The_Conversation_Canada
Coronavirus has brought about an unprecedented global shutdown. China imposed lockdowns in cities in Wuhan and other cities in the province of Hubei from late January, many of which are starting to relax. Much of Europe is under what largely amounts to house arrest. The UK government, meanwhile, recommends stringent social distancing for the most vulnerable for a minimum of 12 weeks. Schools, universities, bars, restaurants, gyms and non-essential shops are closed, with no timetable for reopening. We can only imagine what the repercussions of this will be. Many of us are gripped by the fear of not knowing what the next days, weeks and months will bring. For the first time, perhaps ever, we are not able to plan ahead. We are all been asked to put live on hold. How are we to do this?
26.03.2020 · From The_Conversation_UK
The toll from the bushfires that ravaged Australia from September 2019 to the beginning of 2020 is staggering: more than one billion animals perished in the flames, 33 human lives were lost, 2,500 buildings were destroyed and more than 80,000 kilometres of land were burned. Faced with the scale of this ecological and human tragedy, expressions of solidarity were immediate. We have seen petitions and fund-raising events blossom all over the world, on different p…
11.03.2020 · From The_Conversation_Canada
Young people are drinking less than ever before. Some reading this will be able to recall the 1990s – the decade of peak alcohol, when drinking was a key part of life for young people. The decade saw the rise of pub and club culture, public displays of drunkenness by young adults and the arrival of new kinds of alcoholic drinks you could buy (alcopops anyone?). Flash forward to 2020 and the picture is very different. A range of studies from countries where drinking is a big part of the culture confirms a sharp decline in alcohol consumption among yo…
11.03.2020 · From The_Conversation_UK
Research in medicine, psychology and neuroscience demonstrates the powerful effects of love on our physical and mental health. Feeling loved and being able to express love for others are linked to the reduction of chronic pain, anxiety and depression, improved functioning of the immune system, reduced risk of cancer, improved cardiovascular health, increased life expectancy and f…
09.02.2020 · From The_Conversation_Canada
How did those new year’s resolutions work out for you? Old habits will have already returned for many – you’re not alone if you’ve already stopped using that new gym membership. Similarly, you’re in good company if 2020 is already stressing you out. Stress, and more chronic exhaustion such as burnout, is commonplace within the modern workplace. People are sinking under the pressure of an attendance culture that glorifies being present at work at the expense of their health. But why exactly does this happen and what can you do to prevent it?…
07.02.2020 · From The_Conversation_UK
Review: Platform Papers 62: Performing Arts Markets and their Conundrums, by Justin Macdonnell (Currency Press) The performing arts may be a public good that serve to enrich Australia’s cultural imagination, but they are also a product competing for audience share and government, corporate and private support. Established in 1994, the Australian Performing Arts Market (APAM) has aimed to facilitate one aspect of this “arts market” by hosting biennial trade fairs that connect national and international ....
05.02.2020 · From The_Conversation_Australia
First marketed in the late 1990s, neonicotinoid insecticides have become the world’s most widely used group of insecticides. They offer lower toxicity to mammals than the insecticides they replaced. But their systemic nature means that all parts of the plant become toxic to insect pests. Even just a coating around seeds offers weeks of protection to a growing crop. This is great for farmers. But the characteristics that make them so ....
05.02.2020 · From The_Conversation_Africa
A busy yet serene pub at the heart of a thriving village community is an image most of us are familiar with. The reality, however, is that there has been a decline in the number and usage of these community hubs. In 2018, the Office for National Statistics found that 23% of pubs across the UK had closed between 2008 and 2018. The reasons for this are interrelated and varied but ...
05.02.2020 · From The_Conversation_UK
At the 2020 BAFTA awards, Joaquin Phoenix called out systemic racism in the film industry in his acceptance speech for leading actor. He said: "I think that we send a very clear message to people of colour that you’re not welcome here. I think that’s the message that we’re sending to people that have contributed so much to our medium and our industry and in ways that we benefit from. […] I think it’s more than just having sets that are multicultural. We have to do really the hard work to truly understand systemic racism.
05.02.2020 · From The_Conversation_Australia
When we are imagining this time, next year, are we limiting our thinking to how we avoid the conditions we faced in this summer? Or are there bigger questions we can ask? ShutterstockEditor’s note: Today, on Trust Me, I’m An Expert, we hear from Clare Cooper, design lecturer at the University of Sydney, on how futuring techniques can help us think collectively about life under a drastically hotter climate. Her accompanying essay is below.
31.01.2020 · From The_Conversation_Australia
According to experts, today’s global agriculture system faces a crisis. Intensive farming with heavy ploughing machinery is causing soil to be lost up to 100 times faster than it is formed – and valuable stored carbon with it too. The soil that remains is becoming depleted of nutrients, thanks to repeated cultivation of the same staple crops without respite. To delay the consequences of this “cereal abuse” and soup up crop yields, farmers artificially fertilise soils with synthetic nitrogen, typically made using natural gas or…
30.01.2020 · From The_Conversation_UK
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