Browse Articles By Tag: culture
New Zealand’s long-awaited zero carbon bill will create sweeping changes to the management of emissions, setting a global benchmark with ambitious reduction targets for all major greenhouse gases. The bill includes two separate targets – one for the long-lived greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide, and another target specifically for biogenic methane, produced by livestock and landfill waste.
08.05.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
In an historical decision, Taiwan’s top court has ruled in favour of gay marriage. The May 26 verdict raised the hopes of many LGBT activists throughout the region, especially in China and Vietnam. As is all too common worldwide, homophobia causes suffering in Vietnam, where until 2000 it was illegal for gay couples to live together. Homosexuality was only removed from the official list of mental il…
28.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Global
There is a very special section of artworks known as artists’ books. These are artworks in the form of books rather than books about art. South African art collector and philanthropist Jack Ginsberg began collecting in this field in the early 1970s. He recently donated this world-renowned collection – and the biggest in the southern hemisphere – to Wits Art Museum in Johannesburg. Part of the collection, which includes more than 3 000 artworks plus thousands of additional items related to the field…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Africa
The world’s a mess. How do thoughtful people make sense of it all? In this series we’ve asked a number of our authors to suggest a book, philosopher, work of art – or anything else, for that matter – that will help to make sense of it all. Back in the 1990s, some speculative fiction bookshops sold a T-shirt with the slogan, “Reality is for people who can’t cope with fantasy”. Today, bookshops are almost extinct, while fantasy geeks can link to 3-D printers to fabricate their T-shirts. Speculative fiction consists o…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Africa
Leggings on women challenge all kinds of conventions about how they take up space with their strong and active bodies. I’m writing this at my office computer wearing leggings and a short skirt. I wear the leggings because I ride my bike to work and they keep my legs warm. I add the skirt when I get to the office because most here would consider leggings alone inappropriate work attire for a middle-aged academic administrator. After this week, it’s clear that some people don’t think they are appropriate attire for students on campus either. Maryann White, a mother of four sons,…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Canada
In a city graced with remarkable architecture, the cathedral of Notre Dame may be Paris’ most striking edifice. So when it was engulfed by a fire that toppled its spire, it seemed as if more than a building had been scorched; the nation had lost a piece of its soul. How can a country respond to witnessing the devastation of its most magnificent structure? As I watched the images, I couldn’t help but think of a similar tragedy that took place in 19th-century Russia – a story I tell …
16.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_USA
Research with Canadian families found that modelling of healthy food intake by fathers, but not by mothers, was associated with a healthier diet among their children. Helping our children to develop healthy eating, exercise and screen-time behaviours is an important public health goal globally. This is because behaviours established early in life also often track into adulthood. And these behaviours have a big impact on a person’s risk for chronic diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, many Canadian children are not establishing healthy ha…
11.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Canada
On the 500th anniversary of his death, this series brings together scholars from different disciplines to re-examine the work, legacy and myth of Leonardo da Vinci. Leonardo’s notebooks are filled with illustrations of nature, both plants and animals, their interactions with humans and in local ecosystems. Did his deep engagement with the natural world make him an environmentalist ahead of his time? Leonardo was a child of the Tuscan countryside, raised in ...
01.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
There is no better place to assess the state of “auteur” African cinema than at its premier showcase, the biennial film festival in Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso. Popularly known by its acronym, Fespaco, the Festival panafricain du cinéma et de la télévision de Ouagadougou recently celebrated its 50th birthday. Fespaco and the 1966 Journées cinématographiques de Carthage in Tunisia were the earliest concrete steps towards the idea of African cinema on African soil. These two film festivals were ...
18.03.2019 · From The_Conversation_Africa
When the UK joined the Common Market in 1974, the country’s restaurants had a total of 26 Michelin stars, the industry standard restaurant rating, in Britain. In 2019 there are 163, including five restaurants with three stars – the highest honour awarded. Is this a coincidence or has membership of the European Union enabled the development of the UK’s vibrant contemporary food scene?
18.03.2019 · From The_Conversation_UK
Our decision-making and conduct is influenced by what we read, see or hear. Eat blueberries for the antioxidants. Exercise daily at a moderate intensity for optimal heart health. Get the vaccine to prevent the disease. Our decision-making and conduct is influenced by what we read, see or hear. And many parts of our lives, from the food we eat to our quality of sleep, can in some way be linked back to scientific research. The media — aiming to inform or engage — can end up peppering readers with sensationalism, hype or inaccurate science stories that shape our day-to-da…
26.02.2019 · From The_Conversation_Canada
The exhibition Heaven and Earth in Chinese Art, Treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei, is the first major loan to Australia from this repository of what have become the canonical art works of Chinese culture. It deserves to be seen by all those interested in Chinese art, and hopefully will be the precursor for many such loans in the future.
20.02.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
The study of caribou ecology in the Sahtú region of Canada's Northwest Territories shows how western science and Indigenous Traditional Knowledge are used together. An article I published last year in The Conversation and republished in Smithsonian Magazine about Indigenous Traditional Knowledge and western science touched a nerve among some readers. My article discussed examples of Indigenous peoples having detailed knowledge of animal behaviour, coastal ecology and historical events that ...
18.02.2019 · From The_Conversation_Canada
The Village People's Glenn Hughes (second from left) epitomised the leatherman look. Mario Casciano“Leathermen” are gay men who wear leather clothes that draw inspiration from masculine institutions like the military, the police, and motorcycle gangs. They also take great pride in their muscular bodies, dressing in leather to cultivate an image of “hypermasculinity” – a term that’s usually used to describe how some heterosexual men look and behave to prove that they are “manly”. Leathermen are attached to a thriving subset of gay and lesbian subcultures all over the world. The “leatherm…
17.02.2019 · From The_Conversation_Africa
Per page: