Browse Articles By Tag: art
In an historical decision, Taiwan’s top court has ruled in favour of gay marriage. The May 26 verdict raised the hopes of many LGBT activists throughout the region, especially in China and Vietnam. As is all too common worldwide, homophobia causes suffering in Vietnam, where until 2000 it was illegal for gay couples to live together. Homosexuality was only removed from the official list of mental il…
28.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Global
U.S. technology giant Microsoft has teamed up with a Chinese military university to develop artificial intelligence systems that could potentially enhance government surveillance and censorship capabilities. Two U.S. senators publicly condemned the partnership, but what the National Defense Technology University of China wants from Microsoft isn’t the only concern. As my research shows, the advent of digital repression is profoundly affecting the relationship between citizen and state. New technologies are arming ...
22.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_USA
Artificial intelligence systems can – if properly used – help make government more effective and responsive, improving the lives of citizens. Improperly used, however, the dystopian visions of George Orwell’s “1984” become more realistic. On their own and urged by a new presidential executive order, governments across the U.S., including state and federal agencies, are exploring ways to use AI technologies. As an AI researcher for more than 40 years, who has been a consultant or participant in many government projects, I believe it’s ...
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_USA
There is a very special section of artworks known as artists’ books. These are artworks in the form of books rather than books about art. South African art collector and philanthropist Jack Ginsberg began collecting in this field in the early 1970s. He recently donated this world-renowned collection – and the biggest in the southern hemisphere – to Wits Art Museum in Johannesburg. Part of the collection, which includes more than 3 000 artworks plus thousands of additional items related to the field…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Africa
The world’s a mess. How do thoughtful people make sense of it all? In this series we’ve asked a number of our authors to suggest a book, philosopher, work of art – or anything else, for that matter – that will help to make sense of it all. Back in the 1990s, some speculative fiction bookshops sold a T-shirt with the slogan, “Reality is for people who can’t cope with fantasy”. Today, bookshops are almost extinct, while fantasy geeks can link to 3-D printers to fabricate their T-shirts. Speculative fiction consists o…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Africa
Artificial intelligence refers, among other things, to machines’ capacity to demonstrate some degree of what humans consider “intelligence”. This process is being driven by the rapid advancement of machine learning: getting machines to think for themselves rather than pre-programming them with an absolute concept. Take image recognition. Humans excel at this task, but it’s proved difficult to simulate artificially. Training a machine to recognise a cat doesn’t mean inputting a set definition of what a cat look…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Africa
Leggings on women challenge all kinds of conventions about how they take up space with their strong and active bodies. I’m writing this at my office computer wearing leggings and a short skirt. I wear the leggings because I ride my bike to work and they keep my legs warm. I add the skirt when I get to the office because most here would consider leggings alone inappropriate work attire for a middle-aged academic administrator. After this week, it’s clear that some people don’t think they are appropriate attire for students on campus either. Maryann White, a mother of four sons,…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Canada
Smartphones make great citizen research tools. We take them everywhere and they have the functions (GPS, accelerometers, camera, audio, video) to sense, share and mobilize data between consenting citizens. Physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for death globally and has reached the status of a global pandemic — a definition that is usually associated with infectious diseases like influenza. Even those of us who are physically active every day can be ...
17.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Canada
In a city graced with remarkable architecture, the cathedral of Notre Dame may be Paris’ most striking edifice. So when it was engulfed by a fire that toppled its spire, it seemed as if more than a building had been scorched; the nation had lost a piece of its soul. How can a country respond to witnessing the devastation of its most magnificent structure? As I watched the images, I couldn’t help but think of a similar tragedy that took place in 19th-century Russia – a story I tell …
16.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_USA
Growing demand for electric vehicles is important to help cut transport emissions, but it will also lead to new mining. Without a careful approach, we could create new environmental damage while trying to solve an environmental problem. Like solar panels, wind turbines and battery storage technologies, electric vehicles require a complex mix of metals, many of which have only been previously mined in small amounts. These include cobalt, nickel and lithium for batteries used for electric vehicles and s…
16.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
Walmart recently said it plans to deploy robots to scan shelves, scrub floors and perform other mundane tasks in its stores as the retail giant seeks to lower labor costs. While the retail giant did not say which jobs, if any, might be lost as a result, the announcement – and the many more surely to follow at other big box retailers – begs the question: How can workers prepare for a future of increasingly automated work? Millions of today’s jobs are expected to be affected by artificial intelligence and…
15.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_USA
Leonardo da Vinci’s remarkable capacity for careful observation made him an astonishing artist and a brilliant scientist. He was able to compare the speed of a bird’s wing movement downwards and upwards. He noticed the differences between arteries carrying blood from the heart and the veins bringing the blood back, so as to draw accurate models of the human circulatory system. His portrait paintings were groundbreaking because Leonardo was the first to show accurate musculature in the face and neck. Beyond applying his artist’s percept…
15.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_USA
Living longer and loving it. oneinchpunch/shutterstock.comIn 1950, men and women at age 65 could expect to live about 11 years more on average. Today, that number has gone up to 17, and the United Nations forecasts that it will increase by about five more years by the end of the century. One consequence of the increase in life expectancy is that the proportion of the population above age 65 has increased, too. In policy analyses and in the media, increases in these proportions are frequently taken to mean that the population will keep getting older.
12.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_USA
On the 500th anniversary of his death, this series brings together scholars from different disciplines to re-examine the work, legacy and myth of Leonardo da Vinci. Leonardo’s notebooks are filled with illustrations of nature, both plants and animals, their interactions with humans and in local ecosystems. Did his deep engagement with the natural world make him an environmentalist ahead of his time? Leonardo was a child of the Tuscan countryside, raised in ...
01.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
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