Recent Articles
Ethiopia has harnessed the value of irrigation technologies. After rapid economic growth averaging 10% every year between 2004 and 2014, Ethiopia has emerged as an engine of development in Africa. And there are no signs that ambitions for further growth are fading. This is clear from the government’s blueprint to achieve middle-income status – or gross national income of at least US$1006 per capita – by 2025. This would see a rapid increase in per capita income in Ethiopia, which is currently US$783, according to the World Bank. Ethiopia’s growth has been ...
18 hours ago · From The_Conversation_Africa
Andy Murray’s announcement that he is contemplating retirement from professional tennis is sad news – as it always is when one of tennis’ greats prepares to leave the game. The reason for his retirement – a persistent pain in his hip that has lasted for the last 20 months – was clearly evident in his first-round loss in the Australian Open. By the end of five sets he was hobbling badly, prompting commentators to speculate whether – if he had won the match – he would have been fit to contest the next round. This is not a minor pain, but ...
18 hours ago · From The_Conversation_UK
Imagine an internet where you couldn’t access any content unless it complied with every law of all the countries in the world. In this scenario, you would be prevented from expressing views that were critical of many of the world’s dictatorships. You would not be able to question aspects of some religions due to blasphemy laws. And some of the photos you post of your children would be illegal. A development like this is not as far fetched as it currently may seem. Every country wants ...
3 days ago · From The_Conversation_Australia
In signing the Paris Climate Agreement, the Australian government committed to a global goal of zero net emissions by 2050. Australia’s promised reductions to 2030, on a per person and emissions intensity basis, exceed even the targets set by the United States, Japan, Canada, South Korea and the European Union. But are we on the right track to achieve our 2030 target of 26-28% below 2005 levels? With one of the highest population growth rates in the developed world, this represents at least a 50% reduction in emissions per person over the next dozen years.
3 days ago · From The_Conversation_Australia
The Yes Men in 2009 handing out spoof editions of the 'New York Post' with the lead story 'We're Screwed' outlining how “climate change is threatening the lives of New Yorkers — especially those who take the subway to work. Still from the documentary by Laura Nix and the Yes MenLast fall, the New York Times announced the death of one of the world’s most celebrated and irreverent media hoaxers: “Alan Abel, Hoaxer Extraordinaire, Is (on Good Authority) Dead at 94.” For a public satirist who ...
3 days ago · From The_Conversation_Canada
What if you never had to return to work? Never had to return to work at the office, that is. You’d be able to juggle kids on school holidays. You wouldn’t need to navigate traffic jams. Your employer might gain increased productivity, lower turnover and lower lease costs. But there are less obvious downsides. In 2010, as part of building a case for the national broadband network, the Gillard government set a target for teleworking, suggesting the Australian economy could save between ...
3 days ago · From The_Conversation_Australia
Recalling positive memories may help lower the risk of depression in young people who have had a difficult childhood, our latest study has found. Depression often emerges during the teenage years. Many mental health problems in later life are linked to adverse experiences in early life, such as poverty, parents having mental health problems, being bullied, neglect and abuse. Mental illness often emerges earlier in young people who have experienced adversity and is more severe and less responsive to treatment, so it is vital that we have …
4 days ago · From The_Conversation_UK
The unexamined life is not worth living, wrote the Greek philosopher Socrates. He was reflecting on the expression “Know Thyself” – an aphorism inscribed on the temple of Apollo at Delphi and one of the ultimate achievements in ancient Greece. While we walk around the world more or less successful in our endeavours, many of us sometimes have the nagging feeling that we don’t truly know ourselves. Why do we really feel and behave the way we do? While we have some ideas about who we are, our understanding of ourselves is often patchy and in…
4 days ago · From The_Conversation_UK
Many commentators have been alarmed at the electoral wins of ultra conservative leaders around the world, as well as policy decisions such as Brexit made by a popular referendum. They see these as signs of a rising populism. In its benign forms, populism can simply mean ordinary citizens’ desire to see their interests and preferences better reflected in policy making. It may also mean greater direct involvement in government by the people themselves. But in its more dangerous manifestations, populism can mean a ...
4 days ago · From The_Conversation_Australia
You don’t have to be an avid gardener or know all the Latin names of plants to appreciate the opportunity for reflection that a stroll in the garden can afford us. The explosion of colours, shapes, and textures in the garden, the tenacity and ingenuity of the plants, so determined to claim their right to life and beauty, can suspend for us the troubling aspects of everyday life. But gardens are also bound to their political and religious history, traces of which can be …
4 days ago · From The_Conversation_Australia
The right to privacy has become a pressing human rights issue. And rightly so. Big data — combined with artificial intelligence and facial recognition software — has the capacity to intrude on people’s lives in unprecedented ways, in some cases on a massive scale. While much of the discussion has focused on how social media and tech companies use the data they collect about their users, more attention needs to be paid to the wider ...
5 days ago · From The_Conversation_Canada
Since the announcement that I won the Nobel Prize in physics for chirped pulse amplification, or CPA , there has been a lot of attention on its practical applications. It is understandable that people want to know how it affects them. But as a scientist, I would hope society would be equally interested in fundamental science. After all, you can’t have the applications without the curiosity-driven researc…
5 days ago · From The_Conversation_Canada
The Chronic Pain Association of Canada has received money from Eli Lilly Canada Inc., Purdue Canada Inc. and Merck Frosst Canada. A blog post on the association’s website contains messages favourable to increased opioid use. United States congressional report revealed last year that five opioid manufacturers made more than $10 million in payments to patient advocacy groups and professional societies between 2012 and 2017. Initiatives from these advocacy groups and professional societies often echoed and amplified recommendations to increase opioid use.
5 days ago · From The_Conversation_Canada
British oak trees are under threat from a disease known as Acute Oak Decline. Mainly affecting mature trees, it can kill them within four to five years of symptoms appearing. However, while researchers like myself have been looking into what causes it, and trying to find a way to prevent it, our work has been hindered in part by the fact that we have to follow a set of scientific rules known as Koch’s postulates. For more than 100 years, scientists have identified which single organism causes a disease according to these postulates.…
7 days ago · From The_Conversation_UK
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