The_conversation_australia's articles
Visually expressing painful memories and feelings can help let things go. People with dementia can flourish and show creativity in ways they, their caregivers and loved ones never thought possible. Under the guidance of a trained therapist, creative arts therapies use painting, drama, dance and music to help improve quality of life for people with dementia. Around 50 million people worldwide have dementia and it’s on the rise. The condition affects the brain and can result in memory loss and inability to carry out everyday activities, recognise faces or remember words.…
09.05.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
Parks are places where children make their own decisions, explore their imaginations and expand their abilities. Well-designed suburban parks could be an antidote to helicopter parenting. As well as giving kids much-needed time outdoors being active, suburban parks offer kids opportunities to decide what activities they do, new research shows. It’s an ideal opportunity for parents to let go of their task-focused daily agendas, even if just for a little while. Helicopter parenting, or intensive parenting, includes anticipating and solving children’s problems…
08.05.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
The Age newspaper recently highlighted the issue of so-called “helicopter parenting” at universities. The report talked of parents contacting lecturers to ask about their adult children’s grades, sitting in on meetings with course coordinators and repeatedly phoning academics to inquire about students’ progress.
08.05.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
New Zealand’s long-awaited zero carbon bill will create sweeping changes to the management of emissions, setting a global benchmark with ambitious reduction targets for all major greenhouse gases. The bill includes two separate targets – one for the long-lived greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide, and another target specifically for biogenic methane, produced by livestock and landfill waste.
08.05.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
Bullying and harassment are not the same as a student or parent being annoying. Teachers are bullied daily by parents and students. They experience the kind of harassment that would be deemed unacceptable in most workplaces. But, in the case of teachers, such treatment is often dismissed as par for the course. Radio presenter Jon Faine recently suggested we might be overstating students’ bullying behaviour towards teachers. He said: What now is called bullying is what we used to regard as, you know, kind of giving teachers a hard time and teasing and being little …
05.05.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
When you're constipated, you have hard or lumpy stools that are difficult to pass. Most people have experienced being blocked up from time to time, whether it’s while travelling, after taking painkillers, or when you’ve let your diet go. But some people will experience constipation more often, and for longer periods. Chronic constipation is generally defined as a problem that has persisted for six months or more. It can mean you have hard or lumpy stools that you’re straining to pass, or are passing fewer than three stools per week – or both. Constipation is sometimes r…
22.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
This is the last article in our series on homeschooling in Australia. The series answers common questions including why homeschooling is on the rise and how outcomes of homeschooled children compare with those who attend formal schooling. A successful homeschooling experience happens when children and parents know the expectations, set targets and enjoy it. In some families, one child can be home schooled while another attends a mainstream school – if those options suit the individual chil…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
The Australian continent has a remarkable history — a story of isolation, desiccation and resilience on an ark at the edge of the world. It is a story of survival, ingenuity, and awe-inspiring achievements over many years. Shortly after the dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago, Australia was torn from the supercontinent of Gondwana by immense tectonic forces and began its long, lonely, journey north towards the equator. The lush temperate forests of Gondwana slowly disappeared as the Australian landmass pushed…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
Pierre Bayle said all peoples’ beliefs and rituals should be tolerated out of respect for their fundamental humanity. It is telling that the greatest early modern philosophical defender of tolerance was a refugee. Pierre Bayle, a Protestant, fled his native France in 1681. He would lose several family members in the persecution of the Huguenots after Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685. Largely forgotten, Bayle’s writings were among the most widely read of the 18th century. In the wake of the tragic attack in Christchurch, and the wider rise of anti-li…
18.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
International research suggests homeschooled students’ achievements are as good, if not better, than those of their schooled peers. This article is part of our series on homeschooling in Australia. The series answers common questions including why homeschooling is on the rise and whether homeschooled children have enough opportunities for socialisation. Homeschooling is on the increase globally. The BBC recently reported that the number of homeschooled students in the United Kingdom increased by 40% from 2014 to 2017 – from around 34,000 to 48,000 students respectiv…
17.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
The impacts of climate change are already being felt across the Pacific, considered to be one of the world’s most-at-risk regions. Small island developing states are mandated extra support under the Paris Agreement. Many are classified as least developed countries, allowing them special access to development funding and loans. Analysis of climate change adaptation projects in the Pacific shows most focus on rural areas, heavy infrastructure and policy development. Clim…
17.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
Last week, federal environment minister Melissa Price approved Adani’s groundwater management plan for its proposed Carmichael mine. However, Adani’s proposed mine remains highly contested and uncertain. A number of environmental plans are still waiting state approval, and the Queensland government will not extinguish native title over land Adani needs while outstanding Traditional Owners’ court action is unresolved. Members of the Wangan and Jagalingou Traditional Owners Family Council (W&J…
17.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
School funding isn't the only thing the government needs to fix to improve school education. State governments may run schools, but federal decisions still make a big difference to the education of Australian children. Whoever the federal education minister after the May 18 election, he or she needs to put these three things first: fixing school funding establishing a national evidence institute to find out what works best in the classroom, and reinforcing the government’s commitment to reform of initial teacher education. 1. Get school funding right,…
16.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
Growing demand for electric vehicles is important to help cut transport emissions, but it will also lead to new mining. Without a careful approach, we could create new environmental damage while trying to solve an environmental problem. Like solar panels, wind turbines and battery storage technologies, electric vehicles require a complex mix of metals, many of which have only been previously mined in small amounts. These include cobalt, nickel and lithium for batteries used for electric vehicles and s…
16.04.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
Per page: