Browse Articles By Category: - Arts & Culture
This story begins with a serendipitous find at the British Library, during a research trip to examine the archives of writer Angela Carter. Carter’s correspondence attests to the friendships and literary connections that she formed during her life. But on that particular trip it was a single letter sent to Carter by performer, activist and Drag King pioneer Diane Torr that caught my attention. More than just fan mail, Torr’s six-page letter is a powerful narrative of her life, as well as fascinating evidence of how Carter’s work effecti…
03.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_UK
The auditorium buzzes with anticipation. It is opening night for a group of students from the Theatre for Social Change course offered at University of Waterloo. Students are about to present the culmination of their work from the fall term. As the lights dim, the students’ fear and apprehension is palpable. Acting and performance are foreign to most of them and they are unsure of the public reception of what they about to present.
03.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Canada
In a new series, we look at under acknowledged women through the ages. Anne-Josèphe Théroigne or Terwagne (1762–1817) was born at Marcourt, a village south of Liège in modern Belgium. From a comfortable farming family, Théroigne had a remarkably unsettled life after her mother died when she was five years old, living with relatives who provided only erratic access to education. While working as a governess she lived and studied singing in London and Paris, but also survived through unhappy rela…
31.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_Australia
What gives an urban area a particular quality? What is the mood, feeling or atmosphere that makes a “place”? At a superficial glance city spaces might seem defined by road layouts and buildings, infrastructure and zoning laws. But my interest as a researcher and theatre maker is in investigating the kinds of everyday interactions that give these spaces an identity – that make them places. That’s why, over a 13-month period from ...
27.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_Africa
Addiction to being busy is popularly portrayed as a toxic feature of modernity. The acceleration of everyday life is nostalgically compared to the past, when life was supposedly simpler. Yet the question of how best to spend time has always been fiercely contested. The contemporary obsession with over-activity can be given some perspective by considering how humans have balanced periods of activity and repose over the course of history. The Christmas season, of course, is an appropriate time of year to reflect on busyness. The time between Ch…
21.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_UK
Half a century of Christmases ago, the NASA space mission Apollo 8 became the first manned craft to leave low Earth orbit, atop the unprecedentedly powerful Saturn V rocket, and head out to circumnavigate another celestial body, making 11 orbits of the moon before its return. The mission is often cast in a supporting role – a sort of warm up for the first moon landing. Yet for me, the voyage of Borman, Lovell and Anders six months before Neil Armstrong’s “small step for a man” will always be the great leap for humankind.
20.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_UK
BordeauxLa volonté de décloisonnement des disciplines, la recherche d’une plus grande inter- et pluridisciplinarité ainsi que l’injonction contemporaine à la créativité ont conduit ces dernières années au développement de nombreux programmes de collaborations arts et sciences, notamment dans le milieu académique. Prenant généralement la forme de résidences d’artistes dans les laboratoires de recherche scientifique, ces programmes visent à favoriser la créativité des chercheurs et la diffusion des savoirs.
17.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_France
In around 1340 Richard Rolle, a 14th-century Yorkshire hermit and mystic, wrote the Fire of Love, part autobiography but largely a guide to achieving mystical union with God. In chapter 12, he acknowledges that in his early life as a hermit he had been rebuked by various women for paying them too much attention: in one case policing her clothing, in others for making sexualised comments about their bodies, and trying to touch them. In one case he “perhaps already had done so”. It all sounds remarkably like admissions of …
05.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_UK
Qu’est-ce que l’architecture ? Il existe autant de définitions du mot architecture qu’il y a d’architectes, urbanistes, paysagistes, théoriciens de l’architecture et d’habitants sur terre. Pour certains, dont moi, presque tout ce qui est habité, ce qui abrite, tout espace ou construction est architecture. D’une ruine archéologique à un bidonville ; d’une caverne habitée à Matera aux gratte-ciel d’une métropole ; d’un pont à une hutte ; en passant par les villes, villages et les paysages agricoles.
04.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_France
Freedom of speech on Australian university campuses has been heavily debated this year. This is an edited version of a speech given at a summit to explore issues of academic freedom and autonomy hosted by the Australian National University. It’s a longer read, at just over 4,000 words. Enjoy! The student stood, a little nervously, at the office door. Could he discuss his assessment for the semester? He laid out all his recent assignments, sadly none of them very well argued. “I’ve read your comments very carefully”, he said. “And while I do not disagree wi…
04.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_Australia
M. C. Escher (1898-1972) is an artist whose name is synonymous with mathematically challenging, optically intriguing and intellectually perplexing prints. This Dutch artist created a world of impossible objects, endless staircases and radical visual transformations that challenge our grasp of reality and our understanding of the shape of time. His woodcuts, lithographs and engravings, at least in reproduction, have become iconic, where the image is known be…
03.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_Australia
When UNESCO announced that “the reggae music of Jamaica” had been added to its list of cultural products considered worthy of recognition, it was a reflection on the fact that reggae, which grew from its roots in the backstreets and dance halls of Jamaica, is more than just popular music, but an important social and political phenomenon. Jamaica’s application to the committee mentioned a number of artists from Bob Marley and Peter Tosh to Chronixx and the Zinc Fence Band. Some observers may be wondering whether such musicians are a good …
03.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_UK
Film director Joel Coen – one half of the famed Coen Brothers – once quipped that “every movie ever made is an attempt to remake The Wizard of Oz” – and while, strictly speaking, there’s a bit of artistic licence in this statement, it seems that the tale of Dorothy’s adventure on the Yellow Brick Road can reasonably lay clam to being the most influential movie of all time. At least, that’s the finding of researchers in Turin, Italy, who took a database of 47,000 films and cross-referenced them to determine which film has had the great…
03.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_UK
In some societies, kids are taught that they're in control of their own happiness – which makes them more indulgent. As early as the fifth century, the Greek philosopher Thucydides contrasted the self-control and stoicism of Spartans with the more indulgent and free-thinking citizens of Athens. Today, unique behaviors and characteristics seem ingrained in certain cultures. Italians wildly gesticulate when they talk. Dutch children are notably easygoing and less fussy. Russians rarely smile in public. As developmental psychologists, we’re fascinat…
03.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_USA
Per page: