Browse Articles By Category: - Arts & Culture
You don’t have to be an avid gardener or know all the Latin names of plants to appreciate the opportunity for reflection that a stroll in the garden can afford us. The explosion of colours, shapes, and textures in the garden, the tenacity and ingenuity of the plants, so determined to claim their right to life and beauty, can suspend for us the troubling aspects of everyday life. But gardens are also bound to their political and religious history, traces of which can be …
13.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
Tintin: one of Belgium's great gifts to the children of the world. For such a perennially young man, always in a hurry to right the world’s wrongs, it may be strange to hear that Tintin has spent nine decades fighting bad guys around the world. From his earliest adventures in January 1929, as he journeyed into the Soviet Union to report on the excesses of Stalinism, the young journalist’s exploits with his friend Captain Haddock have been translated into more than 70 languages and, at last count sold more than 230m copies around the world.. Tintin, the creatio…
09.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_UK
Portrait of Caterina Cornaro, Queen of Cyprus, c. 1500, by Gentile Bellini. Wikimedia CommonsIn a new series, we look at under acknowledged women through the ages. The life of Caterina Cornaro could easily be the plot of a novel or TV drama. One of the most significant woman of Venice’s golden age, Cornaro (1454-1510) was an important figure in Renaissance politics, diplomacy and arts. She reigned as the queen of Cyprus for 16 years under immense pressure.
08.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Australia
The Patagonian desert in southern Argentina is a harsh environment. Little seems to thrive on its seemingly endless red plains and parched land. Yet in this unlikely place there is a unique bilingual community. It’s made up of the Afrikaans and Spanish-speaking descendants of the about 650 South African Boers, who came to Patagonia in the first decade of the twentieth century. The Boers trace their origins to the Dutch population that settled on the southern tip o…
08.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Africa
What happens when journalists join in the discussion in the often-frightening comments section below their articles? That’s one of the questions I sought to answer in my book, Discussing the News: the uneasy alliance of participatory journalists and the critical public, published earlier this year. In traditional newspaper culture, journalists do not often engage with their readers. So, as a researcher I jumped at the chance of witnessing an attempt to foster a more conversational relationship between journalists and the public at the n…
07.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Global
Most people are familiar with sign language, the system that deaf people use to communicate. What fewer may know is that there are many different sign languages around the world, just as there are many different spoken languages. So how does the grammar of sign language work? Unlike in spoken languages, in which grammar is expressed through sound-based signifiers for tense, aspect, mood and syntax (the way we organise individual words), sign languages use hand movements, sign order as well as ...
07.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Global
The images were striking: massive blockades, protesters donning masks and black hoods suddenly racing across streets, throwing stones and destroying cars. Such were the chaotic scenes during the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany this July. Amid the looting, clashes with police and general frenzy, slogans were also emblazoned on walls offering “Free hugs for Black Blocs.” What are the Black Blocs? And why are they associated w…
07.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Global
What is the predominant aesthetic of the twenty-first century? According to sociology professors Ruth Holliday and Tracey Potts, “we are on the point of drowning in kitsch. A casual survey of the British metropolitan high street offers ample evidence of the kitschification of everyday life.” Kitsch can also be called cheesiness or tackiness. Specialists have defined kitsch as a tasteless copy of an existing style or …
07.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Global
Every day for 1,000 days, 26-year-old Palestinian vlogger Nuseir Yassin published a “one-minute video” on his popular Facebook channel, Nas Daily, sharing his ideas with 11m followers as he traversed the globe. Now the project has come to an end, his success seems to show how social media can provide a platform for ordinary people – a tribute to the rise of citizen journalism over the past decade. Like many other young people today, Yassin began this project in search of a more meaningful life. He described his previous job as a software engineer as “overpaid” and …
04.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_UK
This story begins with a serendipitous find at the British Library, during a research trip to examine the archives of writer Angela Carter. Carter’s correspondence attests to the friendships and literary connections that she formed during her life. But on that particular trip it was a single letter sent to Carter by performer, activist and Drag King pioneer Diane Torr that caught my attention. More than just fan mail, Torr’s six-page letter is a powerful narrative of her life, as well as fascinating evidence of how Carter’s work effecti…
03.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_UK
The auditorium buzzes with anticipation. It is opening night for a group of students from the Theatre for Social Change course offered at University of Waterloo. Students are about to present the culmination of their work from the fall term. As the lights dim, the students’ fear and apprehension is palpable. Acting and performance are foreign to most of them and they are unsure of the public reception of what they about to present.
03.01.2019 · From The_Conversation_Canada
In a new series, we look at under acknowledged women through the ages. Anne-Josèphe Théroigne or Terwagne (1762–1817) was born at Marcourt, a village south of Liège in modern Belgium. From a comfortable farming family, Théroigne had a remarkably unsettled life after her mother died when she was five years old, living with relatives who provided only erratic access to education. While working as a governess she lived and studied singing in London and Paris, but also survived through unhappy rela…
31.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_Australia
What gives an urban area a particular quality? What is the mood, feeling or atmosphere that makes a “place”? At a superficial glance city spaces might seem defined by road layouts and buildings, infrastructure and zoning laws. But my interest as a researcher and theatre maker is in investigating the kinds of everyday interactions that give these spaces an identity – that make them places. That’s why, over a 13-month period from ...
27.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_Africa
Addiction to being busy is popularly portrayed as a toxic feature of modernity. The acceleration of everyday life is nostalgically compared to the past, when life was supposedly simpler. Yet the question of how best to spend time has always been fiercely contested. The contemporary obsession with over-activity can be given some perspective by considering how humans have balanced periods of activity and repose over the course of history. The Christmas season, of course, is an appropriate time of year to reflect on busyness. The time between Ch…
21.12.2018 · From The_Conversation_UK
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